Ways into Teaching



If you already have a degree, consider a postgraduate certificate in education (PGCE). A PGCE course mainly focuses on developing your teaching skills, and not on the subject you intend to teach. For this reason, you are expected to have a good understanding of your chosen subject(s) – usually to degree level – before you start training.

Where can you do a PGCE?
PGCE courses are available at universities and colleges throughout the UK. It may also be possible to study for a PGCE via flexible distance learning, or in a school by completing a programme of school-centred initial teacher training (SCITT), or by completing the School Direct Training Programme

How long does a PGCE take?

Courses generally last for one year full-time or up to two years part-time.

Is there any funding available while I train?

You may be eligible to receive funding while you train for your PGCE.

What qualifications do I need?

You must have a UK undergraduate degree or a recognised equivalent qualification. Find out if your qualifications are equivalent to UK qualifications through UK NARIC. If your degree subject does not link closely to the subject you intend to teach, you may improve your ability to gain a place on an initial teacher training (ITT) programme by following a subject knowledge enhancement course
You also need a standard equivalent to a grade C in GCSE English and mathematics. If you want to teach primary or key stage 2/3 (ages 7-14), you must also have achieved a standard equivalent to a grade C in a science GCSE.

How do I apply for a PGCE?

The majority of PGCE applications are made through the Graduate Teacher Training Registry (GTTR)However, some ITT providers require that you approach them directly.
For secondary courses, you are able to apply to up to four different providers. For primary courses you may apply to two providers, in order of preferenceIf you are unsuccessful with your first choice, your application will be passed on to your second, and so on. 

When should I apply?

Generally speaking, the GTTR accepts applications from mid-September to June for courses starting the following September or October.
However, be aware that courses in primary teaching, physical education (PE) and history are very popular and there is considerable competition for places. To guarantee that your first choice of course provider will consider you, you need to apply before the end of November in the year before you wish to train.

Does it cost to make an application?

It costs £19 to apply through the GTTR for up to four courses starting in 2012. The GTTR website provides further information.

Summary

This section of my research has opened my eyes to a number of things; Primary applicants only apply to two providers where as Secondary apply to four, this must be down to the competitive native and wider courses in Secondary applications. The availability of government funding, applying early for example this site recommends applying by November of the year before you wish to start training. And finally that GCSE grades can effect an applicants entry. If I was not to have carried out this section of research my chances of achieving a place of a PGCE course would have been a lot slimmer. 
WEBSITE TO APPLY


This is the homepage for all PGCE application. GTTR - Graduate Teacher Training Registry

About the GTTR

The Graduate Teacher Training Registry (GTTR) is an admissions service that processes over 50,000 applications each year for full-time and part-time postgraduate teacher training courses at:
  • most universities, colleges of higher education and School-Centred Initial Teacher Training (SCITT) consortia in England
  • most universities and colleges of higher education in Wales
  • almost all higher education institutions (HEIs) in Scotland.
The courses in the GTTR scheme provide training for teaching in primary schools, secondary schools and further education collegesEach year more than 25,000 trainee teachers enter postgraduate teacher training by applying through the GTTR. Trainee teachers who successfully complete a primary, middle years or secondary teaching course in the GTTR scheme will have the Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) needed to teach in state schools in England and Wales or the Teaching Qualification (TQ) required to teach in Scottish schools. Many schools in the independent sector also require their teachers to have QTS or the TQ, even though this is not a government requirement.


Teacher training explained

If you want to teach in state primary or secondary schools in England, Wales or Scotland, you need to complete one of the following types of course successfully:
  • an initial teacher training (ITT) course in England or Wales that gives you Qualified Teacher Status (QTS)
  • an initial teacher education (ITE) course in Scotland the gives you the Teaching Qualification (TQ).
If you are not a graduate, you can apply through UCAS. for 3 or 4-year undergraduate degree courses that provide QTS or the TQ.
If you are a graduate or expect to have a degree by September 2013, you can apply through the Graduate Teacher Training Registry (GTTR) for Professional Graduate or Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) courses in England and Wales and for Professional Graduate Diploma of Education (PGDE) courses in Scotland. Most of these courses are full-time and last one academic year, but the Course types section provides information about the different kinds of course provision.
If you successfully complete a primary, middle years or secondary teaching course in the GTTR scheme, you will have the Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) which you need to teach in state schools in England and Wales or the Teaching Qualification (TQ) which is required to teach in Scottish schools. Many schools in the independent sector will also require you to have QTS or the TQ, even though this is not a government requirement.
In England you can take a PGCE course based at a university or college, or take a school-based course run by groups of schools that have formed school-centred initial teacher training (SCITT) consortia.
University and college courses normally incude lectures at the institution and school-based training in at least two of their partnership schoolsPrimary teaching courses include at least 18 weeks of school-based training and if you are taking a secondary teaching course, you will spend a minimum of 24 weeks training in schools.
adviser helping student
SCITT consortia run their courses almost entirely within their member schools. Each consortium will offer training in primary or secondary schools. You will usually be based in the 'lead school' and undertake teaching placements at other schools within the consortium. Teachers in the schools act as mentors to organise and monitor your training. Most SCITT consortia run courses that have been validated by a university or college for the award of their PGCE. You may be required to attend some lectures at this university or college as part of your school-based course.
Where to train?
Below is a map of all the teacher training providers available, not all of them can accommodate every applicants needs. The three examples I have pulled out of the list are relevant to me and in the area where I would consider applying.



W80 - University of Worcester

Henwick Grove
Worcester
Worcestershire
WR2 6AJ
t: 01905 855000
e: 
admissions@worc.ac.uk
w: 
www.worcester.ac.uk

W75 - University of Wolverhampton

Wulfruna Street
Wolverhampton
West Midlands
WV1 1SB
t: 01902 321000

B25 - Birmingham City University

Franchise Street
Perry Barr
Birmingham
West Midlands
B42 2SU
t: 0121 331 5595

Entry Profiles

What are Entry Profiles?

GTTR Entry Profiles can help you make that important decision about which training providers to apply to for your postgraduate teacher training. While teacher training courses will qualify you to teach your subject, the experience will be very different according to the training provider you choose. Which one will suit you best? Do you prefer a school-based course or a college-based course? Will you be happier at a city university, a small college, or a village school? Each offers a unique experience. But which one is for you?
If you are thinking about training as a teacher, you will need to gather and consider a lot of information before you are ready to make a choice. Entry Profiles provide details about the course, about the training provider offering the course, and the information you need about entry qualifications, selection criteria and the provider's admissions policy. This information is essential to enable you to make fully informed choices about the courses for which you will ultimately choose to apply.
Entry Profiles offer invaluable guidance to any graduate choosing a teacher training course. They are compiled by the staff at each training provider, who understand the kind of details you need to know about their courses, and what kind of personal qualities, interests and experiences will be helpful for you to have, in order to be a successful student on the course, and a successful teacher in your chosen subject.

What are Entry Profiles for?

  • To provide important information for anyone interested in applying for a postgraduate teacher training course.
  • To help you understand what it would be like to be a trainee teacher with that training provider.
  • To let you know what the entry requirements are in terms of academic subjects or relevant experience.
  • To describe the course in detail.
  • To give you information about the training provider that is offering the course. Where are they? How far away from your home are they? What facilities do they offer? Is childcare available? Do they offer accommodation? Can they provide support if you have special needs?
  • To let you know what interests, personal qualities, or relevant experience the admissions staff might be looking for in their applicants.
  • To explain the training provider's admissions policy and selection procedures, including (where applicable) information about interviews.

How do I find Entry Profiles on the web?

  • Entry Profiles can be found on GTTR Course Search.
  • When you click on the course title you will see headings, and by clicking on any one of them, you will find more information. The first heading is 'Why train with us', which will give you information about the training provider. These differ greatly, depending on whether the training provider is large or small, a city university or a village school. You will also see headings about the course, entry requirements, selection procedures and the training provider.

Once I have found an Entry Profile on Course Search, what should I look for?



Read the information about the course. Ask yourself if this course covers the aspects of teaching that particularly interest you. Does it have the flexibility you might be looking for? How will it be taught? Will the course give you the opportunity to increase your knowledge of the subject?
Does the Entry Profile tell you about the personal qualities the training provider is looking for in applicants for that course? Does their description sound like you? Do you have the experience they say would be beneficial in their applicants, or the time to acquire it before you apply? Do you think this course will suit you?
Check the academic entry requirements. Are you studying the right subjects for entry to this course? Will you need GCSE qualifications in maths, English or science?
Make sure that you know where the course will be taught - sometimes it is not at the main campus. Will you be able to travel to lectures and tutorials easily, if you live some distance away? Will you need to travel far for the school placements?
Summary
I have included all the able information about the basics to the PGCE course so I feel I have an understanding about the course, overall how they can be delivered, where I can apply and where I can find out specific information about a certain provider. I have chose three providers to look at, they are all relatively close to me as I would want to commute to keep the first year cost down. 




Entry Requirements at Worcester University - Primary years 5-11

An honours degree
A degree, usually a good honours degree (2ii or above) 
An academic strength in an area of the curriculum based on our current extended subject options. In regard to these extended subject studies please note the following expectations: 
If you wish to select English, an English degree, or substantial part of a degree in English, or an A or B grade at A level is normally required. 
If you wish to select ICT, extensive practical work place application of ICT may be acceptable. 
If you wish to select AEY, an Early Childhood Studies degree and/or relevant expertise in the workplace with 3-7 year olds is normally required. 
If you wish to select PE, a Sports Studies degree and/or relevant expertise in a sports/physical education environment is normally required. 

GCSE's
Grade C at GCSE (or equivalent) in English Language, Mathematics and Science is compulsory for all those who wish to study this course. Applicants should hold these qualifications prior to making their application. 

A levels
If your degree is not directly relevant to your extended subject study choice, it may still be possible to consider you if you have an A level in the subject area. Please note that this should be at A or B grade for English. 

School experience
Students should have some recent work experience in a primary school setting before application. 


Good health

Enhanced disclosure from CRB
All applicants will be required to obtain an Enhanced Disclosure from the Criminal Records Bureau. Candidates will be expected to bring some form of Photo ID to interview to assist with this process. 

What we are looking for

Interest in and commitment to education and children
To get the most out of this course, you will obviously need to be enthusiastic about working with children, and possess an ability to relate to them. On the course, you will be encouraged to develop good working relationships with teachers and their pupils. A phased and varied programme of teaching practice will give you the skills and confidence to manage your work and your class. 

Oral and written communication
Communication skills are, of course, vital to the teacher's role and your skills will be developed through teaching and your school experience. Throughout the course, you will have the opportunity to take part in discussions, produce, read and respond to written materials, and give presentations. We will assist you in developing your ability to match your language to a wide range of interpersonal needs and professional demands. 

Literacy, Numeracy and ICT
These are important for all teachers, and this importance is reflected in their prominence in the curriculum. We will help you develop the necessary knowledge and understanding of language and how it works in order to effectively teach literacy. We will also help you to build your understanding of mathematics, so that you can teach numeracy with confidence. You will learn to study fundamental concepts from an advanced viewpoint. In addition, you will have opportunities to develop your existing ICT skills and to learn about their application in a range of areas of the school curriculum

Interpersonal skills
Being a teacher is very much about being a team member, and this is reflected during the course. You will need to work co-operatively on joint projects, work as a member of a team and accept the responsibility of leadership roles. You will have the opportunity to discuss your experiences with a variety of other people. 




How we select our trainees

Qualifications
We expect all applicants to have achieved GCSE Mathematics, English Language and Science prior to making their application. We currently offer in-house tests for English and Maths. 


School experience
We expect all applicants to this course to have some experience within a school or nursery setting prior to making an application. Details of your experience should be apparent from your application form. The experience does not have to be paid work and should be recent. 

Reference
We normally require an academic reference from all applicants. For those applicants who finished their academic courses more than 5 years ago, we realise that this may not be the most appropriate. In such cases, employers or teachers from the school(s) you visited whilst gaining school experience are welcome to comment on your suitability for the teaching profession. 

Interview
The interview day has been designed as an opportunity for you to find out about us as much as for us to find out about you. The following is an outline of what will happen during the day and what we will be looking for. There are four main parts to the interview, as well as a chance to look around the University. 


1. TASK 
In a small group, you will be asked to discuss your experiences of teaching and learning and to come up with a list of characteristics of a good teacher. A tutor or teacher will observe this and will look for: 
- your ability to act as a member of a group
- your sensitivity to others
- the way in which you take on board and respond to the viewpoints of others
- your spoken English [We look for clear Standard English]
- a beginning understanding of the influences on learning 

2. PRESENTATION 
You will be asked to make a very short (maximum 5 minutes) presentation to a group of interviewees, plus a tutor and/or teacher. You will be required to talk about something you have done with a group of children recently. Describe the context of the activity and the purpose behind it. Talk about what you actually did and if possible show some of the outcomes - eg photographs or examples of children's work. Evaluate the success or otherwise of the activity and state what you learned about teaching from this activity. 
During the presentation we will look for: 
- presentational skills
- awareness of what is appropriate for primary children
- ability to self-evaluate
- public 'presence' 

3. INTERVIEW 
Tutors will interview you individually for approximately 30 minutes. During the interview we will look for:
- understanding of the role of a teacher
- clear reasons for wanting to teach
- communication skills
- subject knowledge relevant to primary curriculum
- ability to relate own degree to teaching
- study and personal organisational skills
- level of ICT skills 

When you come to interview please bring a written statement (no more than one side of A4) showing your chosen Extended Subject Study. You will need to demonstrate an appropriate level of knowledge and understanding in this area - ie a substantial element of your degree, an 'A' level (or equivalent) or extensive expertise in the workplace. Please hand this to the interviewer(s) on the day. 
This is also the opportunity for you to clarify your expectations of the course. 

4. WRITTEN ENGLISH TASK 
You will be asked to undertake a half hour task under examination conditions which will ask for a short written account and the marking of some pupil work. Dictionaries will not be permitted. 
We are looking for legible handwriting and correct spelling, grammar and punctuation. 


Summary

The above information is taken directly from the GTTR website on the link provided above. This is exactly what the University of Worcester wants to see throughout the application process and interview stages. The degree grade I was relieved to see is a 2:2 or above which takes a bit of pressure off. It has also been help to see how the interview day is structured and what it contains.


Secondary Design and Technology

Degree or equivalent
A degree, usually an Honours degree in a subject applicable to your teaching subject. Degree equivalent qualifications may also be considered, for example full membership of some professional associations can be considered as graduate status.


GCSE's
Grade C at GCSE (or equivalent) in English Language and Mathematics is essential for all applicants. The College organises alternative examinations for candidates without these qualifications.

School experience
All successful candidates are strongly recommended to undertake some school experience prior to starting the course. Information about this will be sent out with offer letters. 

Good health
The protection of the health, education, safety and welfare of pupils is of great importance in deciding an individual's fitness to teach children. In order to make this assessment, all successful applicants will be required to complete a Medical Questionnaire, which will be assessed by an Occupational Therapist. 

Enhanced disclosure from CRB
All applicants will be required to obtain an Enhanced Disclosure from the Criminal Records Bureau. This must be obtained via the University and be no more than 6 months old at the start of the course. 

Interest in and commitment to education and children
To get the most out of this course, 
you will obviously need to be enthusiastic about working with children, and possess an ability to relate to them. On the course, you will be encouraged to develop good working relationships with teachers and their pupils. A phased and varied programme of teaching practice will give you the skills and confidence to manage your work and your class.
Oral and written communication
Communication skills are, of course, vital to the teacher's role and your skills will be developed through teaching and your school experience. Throughout the course, you will have the opportunity to take part in discussions, produce, read and respond to written materials, and give presentations. We will assist you in developing your ability to match your language to a wide range of interpersonal needs and professional demands. 

Literacy and Numeracy
These are important for all teachers, and this importance is reflected in their prominence in the curriculum. We will help you develop the necessary knowledge and understanding of language and how it works in order to effectively teach literacy. We will also help you to build your understanding of mathematics, so that you can teach numeracy with confidence. You will learn to study fundamental concepts from an advanced viewpoint. 


Interpersonal skills
Being a teacher is 
very much about being a team member, and this is reflected during the course. You will need to work co-operatively on joint projects, work as a member of a team and accept the responsibility of leadership roles. You will have the opportunity to discuss your experiences with a variety of other people.
Reference
We normally require an academic reference from all applicants. For those applicants who finished their academic courses more than 5 years ago, we realise that this may not be the most appropriate. In such cases, employers or teachers from the school(s) you visited whilst gaining school experience are welcome to comment on your suitability for the teaching profession.
Interview
The PGCE course is an intensive year, demanding full time commitment and a lot of hard work (as does teaching). Tutors and mentors are committed to providing generous support for students in meeting demands, provided student teachers are totallycommitted. The selection process is designed to help us decide whether we believe you should train with us, and to help you decide if teaching is the right career for you. 

The programme for the selection process includes:
- Introduction to the course
- Meet in presentation groups and perform presentations
- Group discussion of general issues in education & what it means to be a teacher
- Meet subject tutors as a subject group followed by individual interviews 


You are asked to plan a talk of between 3 to 4 minutes. You will be kept strictly to time. An OHP and whiteboard/flipchart will be available. If you require any other facilities you will need to arrange them in advance. The presentations will take place in small groups which may be of candidates from other subject specialisms. 
The talk should indicate how you would approach teaching a topic in your subject to a key stage 3 group (11-14 year olds). A topic could be subject matter that would take 4 - 6 x 1 hour long lessons to teach. You are advised to spend just over a minute outlining what you would want pupils to learn and the rest of the time explaining what strategies you would use to get them to do this. 
You will be judged on your ability to communicate clearly and on your engagement with the audience. 
We will also ask you to do a written task. All teachers need to be able to write English clearly without errors of spelling, grammar or punctuation, because it is part of their job to teach pupils to do this. This task will help us to identify any difficulties you may have to address before joining the course. 

It is essential for you to spend at least a day in a secondary school before you come to interview, observing some teaching in your subject area. You should also make yourself aware of the National Curriculum requirements of your subject. 
The individual interview will explore subject specific issues as well as your reasons for teaching. It will explore your attitudes to young people and your understanding of what teaching entails. You will be judged against the criteria listed below. 

1. Appropriateness of subject qualifications
2. Capacity to extend subject knowledge
3. Awareness of the role & responsibilities of a teacher
4. Awareness of pupils as individuals
5. Ability to interact with colleagues
6. Ability to communicate effectively
7. Enthusiasm for, and commitment to teaching
8. Awareness of strengths & weaknesses
9. Assertiveness/ability to present oneself 


http://search.gttr.ac.uk/cgi-bin/hsrun.hse/General/gttr_search/StateId/EDbhmVTigb13pApUabD1XQoYRl0js-Usx_/HAHTpage/gttr_search.HsProfile.run?inst=W80&course=W9XD&mod= 20-03-2013/14:50Summary

Following research into Design and technology in secondary schools I have found out that the amount of experience require in classrooms is a lot less and the interview stage is slight different to that of the primary years PGCE. This also does not specifically ask for a particular classification of degree other than it being subject related.


Schools Direct



School Direct is available in primary and secondary schools across England and programmes generally last for one year. Some schools may offer training on a part-time basis; you should contact your chosen school to discuss this. Successful completion of a School Direct course will lead to the award of qualified teacher status (QTS). School Direct programmes may also include a postgraduate certificate in education (PGCE).
In order to help tailor training to your skills and experience, there are two separate School Direct training options:
  • School Direct Training Programme is available to high-quality graduates. You may be eligible for a bursary of up to £20,000 to support you while you train.
  • School Direct Training Programme (salaried) is an employment-based route available to high-quality graduates with at least three years’ work experience who will earn a salary whilst they train
Summary
Initially this seemed like a good option however personally for me I feel I would benefit from the PGCE more because its more time in university being taught how to teach. Where as I get the impression that the Schools Direct route assumes applicants already have the teaching background. However if I was to continue with this route following university I would have to apply for the School Direct Training Programme that is not salaried as I haven't got up to three years experience in a working environment.

Eligibility 


In order to apply for a place on School Direct, you must have:
  • A UK undergraduate degree or a recognised equivalent qualification.
  • A GCSE grade C or above in English and mathematics.
  • A GCSE grade C or above in a science if you are applying to teach primary or key stage 2/3 (ages 7–14).
If you studied outside of the UK, you should visit the National Academic Recognition Centre (NARIC) website to find out whether your qualifications are of an equivalent level to UK GCSEs, A levels and an undergraduate degree.
The School Direct Training Programme focuses on developing teaching skills. You should have a strong understanding of the subject you wish to teach before you start training. If your degree subject does not link closely to your chosen teaching subject, it is recommended that you undertake a subject knowledge enhancement course before you begin training.
In addition, all candidates applying for initial teacher training (ITT) courses beginning after 1 July 2013 are required to have passed the literacy and numeracy professional skills tests before starting teacher training.

School Direct Training Programme (salaried)


If you wish to apply for a place on the School Direct Training Programme (salaried), you are required to have at least three years’ work experience in addition to the eligibility requirements detailed above. This experience may be in any career and does not have to be from an educational setting, but should generally apply to the years following graduation. Schools will decide which skills and experience are important to them and you should contact your chosen school with any questions regarding your experience



Summary
This is the first time since research into ways into teaching I have read you need not only english and maths at a GCSE C or above but also science to teach in primary schools key stage 1 and 2. 


Funding available

School Direct Training Programme (salaried)

You will be paid a salary by the school in which you train. This salary will be in line with the unqualified teacher pay scale. You will not need to pay fees to cover the cost of your qualified teacher status (QTS) award. You will not be eligible for a training bursary.

School Direct Training Programme

You could be eligible for a tax-free bursary of up to £20,000, depending on the subject you want to teach and the degree class that you hold.
In order to encourage the best people to enter the profession, if you are applying for initial teacher training (ITT) courses beginning in 2013 you will need at least a 2:2 degree to be eligible for a training bursary.
In addition, there is a 25 per cent premium paid on the bursaries of School Direct trainees whose training is based in a school where more than 35 per cent of pupils are eligible for free school meals.
You will need to pay tuition fees to cover the cost of your course. Tuition fees will vary according to the training provider with which your chosen school partners to deliver the programme, but the maximum that can be charged is £9000.

Student finance

All candidates from the EU are eligible for a tuition fee loan. In addition, candidates from the UK can also apply for a means-tested maintenance grant of up to £3,250 and a maintenance loan of up to £5,500 (more if you live away from home and you study in London). Gov.uk offers further information about student finance, including a finance calculator to help estimate the grants and loans that may be available to you
Summary
After reading more into the salaried schools direct scheme financial it is a lot more inviting for example you get paid at a unqualified teacher rate and you do not pay tuition fees however you are not eligible for government funding as the unsalaried applicants are.

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